Sage as an essential oil in aromatherapy: Photo credit, ISP
Sage as an essential oil in aromatherapy: Photo credit, ISP

If you’ve enjoyed my previous posts of fun facts on lavender, rose and chamomile, you will probably enjoy this week’s post on sage. I’ve only discussed five fun facts on sage aromatherapy – as there is more information to be found in the Sedona Aromatherapie Sage Aromatherapy Short Course! This post is designed to stimulate your interest!

Derivation of the Word Sage

The first part of the Latin description for sage is Salvia. Salvia is derived from the Latin salvere – which means to save. The herb sage has many uses, some of which quite literally could “save” a person from infections and more.

Use in History

Sage was present during the time of the Black Death in Europe and was one of several herbs used to protect against the deadly disease. Sage was also used historically for rheumatism, menstrual problems, and digestive problems, depending upon the species.

Common Sage vs. Clary Sage

Two of the most common species of sage used as an essential oil in aromatherapy practice are common sage (Salvia officinalis) and clary sage (Salvia sclarea). Both oils are composed of different chemical components. Common sage essential oil is principally composed of ketones whereas clary sage essential oil is principally composed of esters. Therefore, common sage oil is more potent (reactive) than clary sage oil.

Sage or Lavender?

Do not be confused by Latin names for sage! Spanish sage is known by the binomial name of Salvia lavandulifolia – or, as another name in English, lavender sage. However, Spanish, or lavender, sage essential oil retains the characteristics of the Salvia genus – and not the Lavandula genus.

Uses of Sage

Sage has many uses in aromatherapy. Common sage essential oil can be used as an anti-bacterial agent, for wounds, toothache and cleaning the home. Clary sage essential oil can be used for panic attacks, as an anti-inflammatory and to help with skin problems. Spanish sage essential oil has several uses too – including skin care problems.

However, be aware that all types of sage essential oil carry warnings for contra-indications. Check each individual essential oil profile before using – or consult an qualified aromatherapist.

Learn More About Sage in Aromatherapy

If you’ve enjoyed this short post on sage, you might enjoy the Sedona Aromatherapie Sage Aromatherapy Short Course, available for home study. Priced at just $14.99, it is an economical way to learn more about one of the popular plants used as an essential oil in aromatherapy!

For more information, visit the courses home page.

References:

  • Author’s training and experience

  • Caddy, Rosemary, 1997, Essential Oils in Colour UK: Amberwood Publishing Ltd

  • Lawless, Julia, 2001, The Aromatherapy Garden, UK: Kyle Cathie Ltd

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